Theory for English

Theory for English

Country:
USA

Source:
As capitalism is to economics, English is to language
Neil Reynolds
Mar 25, 2006
NB Telegraph-Journal
Copyright © 2006 Brunswick News Inc.
LINK HERE

Story:
This short article gives a brief history of the development of English from the mid-1500’s until today. It also outlines the evolution of American English from British English. As a language English is seen as a free language not tied or hampered by the language cops. Hence, English is to language what capitalism is to economics: Laissez-faire, enterprise and hope.

Facts:
- 1582 estimated English speakers: 4 million. (
Richard Mulcaster)
- 1828 estimated English speakers: 50 million. (
Noah Webster)
- today 2 billion people speakers or studying English.

Language Issues:
- Can a language be seriously manipulated by language cops or academies?
- In 2003 a group of engineers from
Cornell published a paper in Nature modelling why languages die. One of their conclusion is that “status” is a decisive factor whether a language survives or not. (Nature: “Modelling the Dynamics of Language Death.” D Abrams and S Stogatz, 21 August 2003)
- Should a country’s language be regarded as a natural phenomenon or a political asset?

Comments:
- It is evident that English differs by region, social groups or activities (eg British English, Indian English, Science and so on). Should these be regarded as distinct languages or a complex structure within a single language?
- What are the factors that would fragment a language, such as English, into distinctive languages? (Compare Latin with English).
- Will global communication make English more homogenous?
- Will global communication create a global version of English, amongst the global community, and those that do not participate within the global community will continue to develop their local version of English?

Bottom-Line:
Personal initiative is fundamental for capitalism to succeed; this is also true for learning a language.

1 comment:

Alex said...

: )